Sunday, 13 June 2010

Her sins are forgiven, for she loved much

As you might have read in my previous post, the annual Youth Conference is on this weekend, and we have to go down back in a few moments.

But I just want to note the Gospel. Today is a relatively long Gospel: Luke 7:36-8:3. It's main focus is about forgiveness and love and the close connection between the two. The story is probably quite well known. Jesus is invited to eat with a Pharisee and while he is there a woman comes up to Him and starts wiping it feet with her hair while wetting them with her tears. The Pharisee is thinking to himself "If this man were a prophet, he would have known who and what sort of woman this is who is touching him, for she is a sinner." (Luk 7:39 RSV). But Jesus explains that it is not just about sin, but that it is about a conversion of heart.


I think it is interesting that Jesus confirms that this woman is a sinner as He says "her sins, which are many, are forgiven" (Luk 7:47 RSV). God is not really interested in our past, in what we have done. God is interested in who we are, now and at this moment, and who we are going to be in the future.

Therefore, I think this gospel can help us to realise that we sometimes have to let go of the past. It can be very hard to forgive ourselves for the mistakes we have made. But whatever about the effect on ourselves and other, and off course these are important to consider, we should not loose sight of God's mercy. We should not despair, but hope in God's love. On Good Friday/Holy Saturday Judas gave up hope, but Peter trusted in Gods mercy. And by doing so, he grew in love and became the leader of the Church... God is interested who we are, and who we are meant to be. He is inviting us to repent and follow him.

 "The Hope that never disappoints is Jesus Christ" (The theme of the weekend)

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4 comments:

kkollwitz said...

"I think it is interesting that Jesus confirms that this woman is a sinner as He says "her sins, which are many, are forgiven"

Yes, He forgives her sins out loud, so that she and those around her can hear the words of forgiveness. And the woman, by her physical act of repentance, shows Christ, the others, and herself that she is sorry for her sins.

This passage anticipates the sacrament of confession.

Barb Schoeneberger said...

This is one of my favorite Bible passages. Jesus let everyone know, including the woman, that she has a clean slate to write a new life. We are not to be judged on the sins of the past, but on today forward after repentance. It also makes me realize how important it is for us to forgive one another and not hold anything against each other. That's very hard to do sometimes.

evanscove said...

This is one of the most poignant passages in the Gospels. Jesus was very hard on hypocrisy and religious snobbery, but He showed great compassion for the humble and penitent. A strong reminder for us to do the same--while keeping in mind that we too have sinned and need God's mercy and love.

Evan

Sweetums5 said...

<< this gospel can help us to realise that we sometimes have to let go of the past. It can be very hard to forgive ourselves for the mistakes we have made. >>

I totally agree. That's why I've always loved St. Francis de Sales's advice to try as much as possible to be patient and gentle with ourselves.

<< we should not loose sight of God's mercy. We should not despair, but hope in God's love. >>

This reminds me of Fr. Corapi's quote, “Leave the past to God’s mercy. Leave the future to God’s providence. Live the present moment as God’s gift... and that’s why it’s called ‘present’.”

It's funny because we just watched "Kung Fu Panda" with the kids the other week. I thought it was intriguing that the screenwriters included the above line in the film -- except they had one of the characters say it this way instead, "Yesterday is history, tomorrow is a mystery. Today? Today is a gift. That's why we call it the present."

Another quote I recognized in the film was from one of Fr. Groeschel's books entitled, "There are No Accidents." These quotes made me wonder if any of the screenwriters were Catholic or Christian. Being Catholic, I naturally saw them from a Catholic standpoint. Of course, these quotes could've had a non-Catholic source. But I was glad they were included in the film to benefit a wider audience.

<< On Good Friday/Holy Saturday Judas gave up hope, but Peter trusted in Gods mercy. >>

I've always mentioned this to my kids -- how Judas was so hard on himself and couldn't see anything but his sin. He actually thought his sin was bigger than Jesus's love and mercy. And he couldn't stand to see himself so imperfect and sinful. His pride killed him.

Peter, on the other hand, was sorry for his sin, but he had the humility to accept himself for what he was -- a sinner. And most important, he did not lose sight of the enormity of Jesus's mercy and love for him. He was saved because he knew that Jesus's love was bigger than his sin. A great example for us all.

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